FORSTER TIMBER WINDOWS

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Robert@ForsterTimberWindows.co.uk

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©2019 by Forster Timber Windows

SASH WINDOW TERMINOLOGY

Sometimes it can sound like tradesmen are speaking another language!

I try to not bombard my clients with sash window terminology but if you would like to brush up on your sash window knowledge, I have included a list of some of the common sash window terms below.

  • SASH WINDOW

A sash window is made of one or more movable panels, or sashes that form a frame to hold panes of glass, which are often separated from other panes by glazing bars. Please see the Casement Windows & Sash Windows page for more information on sash windows.

 

  • BOX SASH WINDOWS

These are often used to describe the same thing as a sash window. Historically they were heavier and more stately in nature than modern sash windows but both terms are used within the industry.

 

  • BOX

This is the timber frame that houses the moving sashes.

  • SASH

The sash is the part of the window that holds the glass and moves. All sash windows have two separate sashes.

  • SASH CORD

This is the rope-like material that connects the weights to the sash, via a pulley system.

  • CASEMENT WINDOW

​A casement is a window that is attached to its frame by one or more hinges at the side, allowing them to open inward or outward. They have been made of timber since the Victorian era. Please note Casement windows can also be referred to as Casement Sash Windows - which can be a little confusing! Please see the Casement Windows & Sash Windows ​page for more information on casement windows.

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  • GLAZING BAR

Historically glass was produced in small sheets and therefore the glazing bars were created in order to hold several of these small sheets into a larger frame. However they are still produced to keep the look and feel of a period property.

  • WEIGHTS

These are attached to the sash via a sash cord and pulleys, which are housed within the frame so that they are not visible – this is in order to counterbalance the weight of the sash window.

  • PARTING BEAD

This is the dividing timber section/bead that stops the sashes from rubbing against one another.

  • SPIRAL BALANCE SPRINGS

These are coiled springs used in order to counter-balance the weight, and are used instead of weights and pulleys.

  • STAFF BEAD

This is the timber section/bead that attaches to the inside frame of the box. It acts as an outer-lip which holds the sashes in place. 

 

  • UPVC / VINYL SASH WINDOWS

uPVC stands for unPlasticised Polyvinyl Chloride, which is a plastic used in the manufacture of non-traditional windows and doors. Although initially it can be cheaper than timber windows, it doesn't tend to last as long meaning it isn't as cost-effective as timber in the long run. It also isn't a very eco-friendly option. FORSTER TIMBER WINDOWS does not use this material to make sash windows.